Clauses Quiz

This clauses quiz helps us understand everything about clauses in English. We have a detailed article on clauses on the website. It’s time we put our knowledge to the test by trying this quiz on clauses.

Results

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#1. What is a clause in English?

Explanation: it is a group of words that has a subject and its predicate. It may or may not be a sentence as there are two types of clauses.

#2. Which is a clause from the following:

Explanation: it has a subject and its predicate.

#3. What is not a clause from the following:

Explanation: it is a noun phrase, not a clause. It has a noun (people) and a modifier in the form of a present participle phrase (wanting to be an actor).

#4. What must a clause have?

Explanation: a clause is the combination of both a subject and its predicate/verb. The absence of either will make it not be a clause.

#5. Which clause is also called a sentence?

Explanation: An independent clause is a complete sentence as it does not depend on anything to give a complete meaning, like a dependent clause, also known as a subordinate clause.

Examples:

  1. I exercise.
  2. Tom lives here.
  3. You are a friend.
  4. The match was exciting.

#6. What is a dependent clause?

Explanation: this is possible when the subject is implied, which happens in imperative sentences. Examples:
1. Leave!
2. Start.

Here, the subject is implied, which is ‘you’. 1) You leave. 2) You start.

#7. How many types of dependent clauses are there?

Explanation: the three types of dependent clauses are ‘noun clauses’, adjective clauses’, and ‘adverb clauses.’

#8. What is an independent clause?

Explanation: it starts with a subordinating conjunction THAT and does give a complete meaning; the other options don’t start with a subordinating conjunction and give a complete meaning.

#9. Choose the true statement.

Explanation: it can function as a noun, and as a noun, it can definitely work as the subject of a sentence.

#10. Which example does not a dependent clause in it?

Explanation: it has two independent clauses joined with the coordinating conjunction and. Because is not a subordinating conjunction here, it is a part of the prepositional ‘because of’.

#11. Which is not an independent clause from the following options?

Explanation: It starts with a subordinating conjunction THAT and does give a complete meaning; the other options don’t start with a subordinating conjunction and give a complete meaning.

#12. Which of these is another name for an independent clause?

#13. Which of these is another name for an dependent clause?

#14. Can a clause be of one word?

Explanation: This is possible when the subject is implied, which happens in imperative sentences. Examples:
1. Leave!
2. Start.

Here, the subject is implied, which is ‘you’. 1) You leave. 2) You start.

#15. Choose the true statement.

Explanation: A dependent clause can be a part of a subject, working as an adjective.

Ex – The man whom I have called for the interview is a genius.

In this sentence, the dependent clause is a part of the complete subject, modifying the headword ‘man’. The subject here is a noun phrase having a premodifier (the) and a postmodifier (whom I have called for the interview (dependent clause)).

#16. Which is an example of a dependent clause?

Explanation: It starts with a subordinating conjunction ‘if’ and has both the subject (you) and its verb (love) in it. The other two main clauses (independent clauses).

Finish

Related posts:

  • Dependent clause
  • Independent clause
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Ashish found his first love—the English language—a few years back. Since then, he has been immersed in the language, breaking down the language and teaching it to passionate English learners. He has a flair for listening to the English language (podcasts, sitcoms, stories), observing the nuances, and making it easy for English learners. He is known for breaking down complex English topics and making them easy to be understood.

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